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Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

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April 2016 - Volume 14 Number 4
 
 
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"Wáa sá iyatee?"
The Tlingit Greeting
How are you?
 
 


Red-headed Woodpecker
(Melanerpes erythrocephalus)

 
 
"Hotehimini kiishthwa"
Strawberry Moon
Shawnee
 
 
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"A Warrior is challenged to assume responsibility, practice humility, and display the power of giving, and then center his or her life around a core of spirituality. I challenge today's youth to live like a warrior."
~Billy Mills~
 
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We Salute
Remember

A Poem by Joy Harjo
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Our Featured Artist: Honoring Students
Quebec Mohawk Designer's Beaded Cape Gifted To Michelle Obama

Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau offered a unique gift to Michelle Obama today, during the Trudeau family's visit to the White House: an aboriginal beaded cape.

The cape was made by Tammy Beauvais, a fourth generation artisan from Kahnawake, Que.
 
Eagles Nest Students Take Top Honors At Tuba City Math League Competition

Students from Eagles Nest Intermediate School in Tuba City competed against 20 other Arizona schools in an annual math competition in individual and team settings.

More than 200 students entered the overall public school competition.
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Our Featured Story: First Person History:
Tonalea Homes Get Electricity

On March 4, Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez traveled to Tonalea to celebrate completion of the White Mesa power line project, which brought electricity to 16 families who have been immobilized by the federal government's policy to ban development in the area since the mid-1960.
 

History of the
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan

Chapter Fourteen
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News and Views Banner
Education News Education News
Bernie Sanders Visits Navajo Nation

Bernie Sanders (I- VT) visited the Navajo Nation March 17 and put on a rally at Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort before an enthusiastic crowd of thousands of people and addressed Native American issues.

Sanders said there is sadly no discussion that since settlers first came to this country, Native Americans have been lied to, they have been cheated and negotiated treaties have been broken.

 
Jane Sanders Visits Oak Flat

Jane Sanders, wife of presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (I- Vermont), visited the Apache Stronghold at Oak Flat campground, a sacred site to the San Carlos Apache, calling attention to the fight against a land swap that will allow mining in the area.

The controversial rider, which circumvented normal legislative procedures, was attached to the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act.

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Education News Education News
Painting The Legends

Oneidas, and other Haudenosaunee, rely on legends to teach them life lessons, history, the importance of taking care of the earth, and more. Such stories have been passed down from generation to generation with each family emphasizing a particular point or adding embellishments.

And while these stories have certainly been told orally and written down (see Legend of the Mosquitoes and Autumn Color) several Oneida and other community members have put the legends to canvas.

 
"Wilderness Skills of Our Ancestors" Demonstration Offers Insight Into Past

"The Wilderness Skills of Our Ancestors" demonstration on Feb. 20 at the Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways provided a packed room of participants with some indigenous knowledge and offered insight into the past.

Jim Miller of Willow Winds gave a spirited interactive demonstration that featured multimedia and some handson opportunities to learn about the tools and products used back in the day.

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Preserving Language Preserving Language
In Their Own Words

EIGHT YEARS AGO, Delia Bull Waskewitch's ancestors visited her in a dream. She and her husband had just driven six hours from their home in Onion Lake Cree Nation in Saskatchewan to the foothills of the ­Rockies in Morley, Alberta. There, she had made offerings of tobacco to the mountains and the sacred Bow River, and asked for the grandfathers' help with a work problem.

 

Ho-Chunk Launch New Language Programs

Language teachers Dana DeBoer and Gordon Thunder find joy in hearing their high school-age students speak Ho-Chunk.

The language of the Native American tribe has seen a steady decline in fluent speakers in recent years, but new and revived efforts to pass it on to future generations have begun and will be ongoing in the future.
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Living Traditions Living Traditions
"Unbound: Narrative Art Of The Plains"

The National Museum of the American Indian’s George Gustav Heye Center in New York’s exhibition “Unbound: Narrative Art of the Plains” opens March 12 and continues through Dec. 4 in the museum’s East Gallery; admission is free.

“Unbound” reflects the dynamic tradition of narrative art among Native Nations of the Great Plains. The exhibition traces the evolution of the art form from historic hides, muslins and ledger books to a wide selection of contemporary works by Native artists, the majority commissioned by the museum exclusively for this exhibition.

 
Museum Home To New Water Bird Tipi

Last year curators at the Jim Gatchell Memorial Museum, Buffalo, Wyo. were excited to erect an Indian tipi, designed and inspired by Bilford Curley Sr., Northern Cheyenne elder and society man, and painted by Jim Starkey (Defender Eagle), Cheyenne River Sioux. The unique and colorful tipi will be displayed on the museum grounds throughout the summer season, a highlight for museum guests, said Museum Director John Gavin.

By 2014, the museum’s 15-year-old, Plains Northern Cheyenne Tipi was in dire need of replacement.
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Preserving Language Living Traditions
In Effort To Preserve Language, Website Posts News In Lakota

A new website created with a primarily Native American audience in mind is posting news, features, sports and weather entirely in Lakota — the first of its kind to do so — in an attempt to help preserve a language that after forced assimilation policies is now spoken by fewer than 2,000 people.

The site was developed by partners who have been involved in several initiatives to embed the Lakota language in various aspects of life. Their goal with Woihanble.com — which translates to "dream" — is to get the language out of the classroom.
 
Haudenosaunee Delegates Travel To Washington DC

On February 22nd 2016 a delegation of Haudenosaunee Chiefs and Clanmothers and observers met with federal representatives. The meeting was held in the Treaty Room of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building a few doors from the White House. The meeting was to recognize and honor the signing of the 1794 Treaty of Canandaigua.

Our protocols were followed as was expected by our history with the United States. Chief Howard Thompson began with an Opening Address and then followed by Words of Condolence as is our custom when meeting with another Nation. One of the United States’ representatives then spoke words of condolence to us.
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Education News   Education News
How The North Wind Lost His Hair

The howling old north wind is afraid to come to the country around the Gulf of Mexico. Only now and then does this cold fellow dare to come into the south, and when he does he does not stay long. He is afraid of the strong young south wind. Once the two winds had a great fight. There are still signs of that fight in the southern woods. The Natchez and the Tejas Indians, who lived along the Gulf, had a story to tell about the north and the south winds and why the moss that grows in the trees is a sign of their fight.

 
EBCI Ancestors Remained East For Various Reasons

The common perception of why the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians' ancestors remained in North Carolina after the Trail of Tears in the 1830s is that many of them hid in western North Carolina's mountains.

During a presentation at the Trail of Tears Association Conference at Cape Girardeau, historian and genealogist Anita Finger Smith of Cherokee, North Carolina, covered the five circumstances during the early 19th century that contributed to the EBCI's ancestors remaining east.

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Education News   Living Traditions
Behind First Nations Headdresses: What You Should Know

When headdresses make the news, the story usually revolves around non-indigenous people wearing them — and whether that's appropriate.

Recently Tsuu T'ina First Nation made national headlines, and stirred up debate, when it gave Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a headdress and an "aboriginal name," Gumistiyi, which translates to "the one that keeps trying."
 
The Revenant's Duane Howard Outfitted By Haida Designer For Academy Awards Red Carpet

It's a designer's dream to dress a celebrity for the Academy Awards, but most designers couldn't step up to the challenge of stitching together an outfit on one week's notice.

That's exactly what happened to Haida designer Dorothy Grant, who was asked to outfit The Revenant actor, Duane Howard.

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Education News   Education News
Return Of Vancouver Island Elk A Boon For Kwakwaka'wakw First Nation

For decades, the population of Roosevelt elk in the forests near Campbell River, B.C., has struggled to remain viable, with only a few animals made available for local First Nations to hunt.

But now, the herds are growing, which is providing a lot of meat to the Kwakwak'awakw First Nation.
 
Bison Bones Found At Lake Bottom Tell Few Tales

On a windy, much warmer day on this lake, Roger Van Surksum snagged the first bison bone with a fishing hook. The fishing guide knew it was no walleye and reeled it in slowly, carefully. The bone was 10 inches long, he said, "as black as the ace of spades."

He put it in the back of his truck but couldn't get it out of his mind.

"I had to figure out what it was," said Van Surksum, 69, standing near the shore of Lake Victoria in Alexandria this week.
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In Every Issue Banner
About This Issue's Greeting - "Wa s iyatee?"
"How are you?" is "Wa s iyatee?" in Tlingit. That is pronounced similar to "wah sah ee-yah-te." But that is not generally used as a greeting. Modern Tlingit people sometimes greet each other with "Yak'i yagiyee" which literally means "good day."
Nature's Beauty:
Red-headed Woodpecker
 
This Issue's
Favorite Web sites
 
A Story To Share:
The Legend of the Flute
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Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.
 
 
Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000 - 2016 of Vicki Williams Barry and Paul Barry.
 

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