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Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

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May 2016 - Volume 14 Number 5
 
 
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"Wáa sá iyatee?"
The Tlingit Greeting
How are you?
 
 

Pasque Flower (>Pulsatilla hirsutissima)
 
 
"Hotehimini kiishthwa"
Strawberry Moon
Shawnee
 
 
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"A Warrior is challenged to assume responsibility, practice humility, and display the power of giving, and then center his or her life around a core of spirituality. I challenge today's youth to live like a warrior."
~Billy Mills~
 
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We Salute
JOE Medicine Cr0w

>Joe Medicine Crow, A War Chief, Historian And The Last Link To The Battle Of Little Big Horn, Dies At 102

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Our Featured Story: Honoring
Medicine Crow's Legacy Lives On In More Than His Name

When Joseph Medicine Crow wrote the important book, "From the Heart of The Crow Country: The Crow Indians' Own Stories," he lamented, "the traditional historians and storytellers are all gone now and I must work with their children and grandchildren, who have been exposed to their views and recitals of the old stories."

He, of course, did not count himself among the traditional historians and storytellers then. But, he was, and now he's gone.

 
President Obama's Statement On The Passing Of Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow

In 2009, President Barack Obama presented Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor bestowed on any individual in the United States.

Yesterday, Dr. Medicine Crow walked on at the age of 102.

On Monday, April 4, the White House released President Obama's statement on the passing of Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow.

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Honoring Students: First Person History:
A 'Sliver' Of Hope

Deep within the genuine strengths of each individual, there often lies a shattered image of security, value, and hope. In the confines of every American Indian reservation, thousands of native males and females have felt that feeling of isolation after being diminished to the burdens of violence, domestic, emotional, and sexual abuse. A cry for help is sought in an attempt of desperation and rescue, but the biggest problems revolve around the ignorance of the subject matter, as well as native victims who choose not to confess about their own dilemmas.

 
How Linguists Are Pulling Apart the Bering Strait Theory
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Living Traditions Living Traditions
Strengthening Identity: The Cradleboard Project Instills History And Tradition

When Gavino Limon was 14 months-old, he began his professional career as a champion Grass Dancer, a mere five months after he began walking. Limon is now six years-old and continues his love for dancing as a member of the world famous Native Pride Dance Troop. His parents, Douglas and Rachel Limon believe that having him in a cradleboard during his infancy had a tremendous influence on his advanced large motor skills

 
The Science Behind Smudging: What Really Happens When We Burn Sage

The practice of smudging dates back to prehistoric times, and is still very much in use today worldwide for cleansing everything from dwellings to human spirits. However recent research has shed light on the popularity of this activity, revealing that burning certain plant matter actually clears harmful bacteria.

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Cultural Learning Cultural Learning

Why You Probably Shouldn't Say 'Eskimo'

Confused about the word Eskimo?

It's a commonly used term referring to the native peoples of Alaska and other Arctic regions, including Siberia, Canada and Greenland. It comes from a Central Algonquian language called Ojibwe, which people still speak around the Great Lakes region on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. But the word has a controversial history. (Editor's note: And that's why it's not used in the stories on Greenland that NPR has posted this week.)
 
Native American Mascot Commission A Model For Nation

Members of a commission that studied Native American mascots in schools on Monday reported success, blazing the way for a national effort.

Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, last year announced the commission, which was charged with studying how communities can respect the culture of Native Americans while also maintaining traditions.
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Preserving Language Living Traditions
81-Year-Old Native Woman Creates Dictionary Of Her Tribe's Language

At 81 years old, the great-grandmother is one of only 200 Wukchumni left living in the San Joaquin Valley of California and has taken it upon herself to revive the language.

The process has taken seven years and required Wilcox to learn to use a computer. "I'm just a pecker, one word at a time," she said. "When I had all these words together, I thought it would be a good idea to try to make a dictionary."

 
Native Women’s “Sinew” Art Exhibit Defies Stereotypes

1992 marked the quincentennial of Columbus’s ruinous landfall. As state-sponsored anniversaries go, National pride and patriotic excitement was on a high that year. But, so was the critical voice. Natives did what they’ve done since 1492 and resisted triumphant expressions of colonization. Curators and some artists looked to frame many exhibitions with meaning derived from a critical, Post-Colonial context.

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Our History Our History
The Ancestors Of The Inupiat Were Technological Pioneers

About 1,000 years ago, Norse explorer Leif Ericson bumped into the New World at Newfoundland. The old world was filling up, with 300,000 people living in the Roman capital of Constantinople. At the same time, up here in Alaska, the ancestors of today's coastal Alaska Natives were quietly having one of the more successful runs in human history.

 
Bowlegs Town History, Artifacts Unearthed

Not far from the Suwannee River, historic Bowlegs Town rests almost like a whisper within a wide vista of North Florida high ground. The town is flanked by coastal mangroves and grassy plains with fingerlike waterways that slither west into the Gulf of Mexico and thick oak hammocks that shadow the Dixie County outback to the east.

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Legends Legends

A Dakota Creation Story

There are several Dakota creation stories.There is a creation story that says the Dakota came into existence about the lakes at the head of the Rum River (near Mille Lacs Lake). Another related creation story says that after a flood some of the people entered into Mille Lacs Lake and lived underwater, and later emerged from the sacred lake as human beings into this world. The wisest of teachings came from the old white haired woman in the lakes, she was the mother of a sacred lake people.

 

 

Ogima Kechewaubishashe – Great Marten

A Chippewa Legend

The unwritten history of the country surrounding the present site of Duluth dating back over 300 years, shows the country in possession of the Sioux tribe with their leading village located at the foot of the rapids of the St. Louis river near the mouth of Mission creek. This spot was then known as Na-ga tche-wa-nang (no more current) was covered with the tepees of the Sioux braves and was the abiding place of the women and children of their tribe.
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Legends Legends

The Legend of Devil's Tower

The Teton Lakota were great travelers, their journeys covering much of North America. They knew the location of salt deposits. They knew where to find pigments for their paints. They made journeys to the northern woods to gather the sweet juices of the maple tree. They lived by the hunt, so they followed the grazing herds of buffalo, and from early springtime to autumn they gathered fruit and edible vegetation.

Thus, it is told, one time a caravan of Teton Lakota was slowly moving toward the Black Hills to harvest the many varieties of fruit abounding there. Such journeys were always leisurely, well-ordered and pleasurable.

 
Mato Tipila

Long ago, two young boys found themselves lost on the great prairie. They had played together one afternoon and had wandered far out of the village. Then they had shot their bows still farther out into the sagebrush. Then they had heard a small animal make a noise and had gone to investigate. They had come to a stream with many colorful pebbles and followed that for a while. They had come to a hill and wanted to see what was on the other side. On the other side they saw a herd of antelope and, of course, had to track them for a while. When they got hungry and thought it was time to go home, the two boys found that they didn't know where they were.

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In Every Issue Banner
About This Issue's Greeting - "Wa s iyatee?"
"How are you?" is "Wa s iyatee?" in Tlingit. That is pronounced similar to "wah sah ee-yah-te." But that is not generally used as a greeting. Modern Tlingit people sometimes greet each other with "Yak'i yagiyee" which literally means "good day."
Nature's Beauty:
Pasque Flower
 
This Issue's
Favorite Web sites
 
A Story To Share:
The Origin Of The Rainbow
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Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.
 
 
Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000 - 2016 of Vicki Williams Barry and Paul Barry.
 

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