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Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

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April 2017 - Volume 15 Number 4
 
 
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"Um waynuma?"
The Hopi Greeting
you're around?
 
 


Bald Eagle

 
 
"Kwiyamuya"
The Windbreaker Moon
Hopi
 
 
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"I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again."
~Crazy Horse~
 
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We Salute
Women's History:
Elizabeth Cady Stanton And The Seneca Women

Women's history month would not be complete without an article about Elizabeth Cady Stanton. You might be surprised to learn that this most famous women's rights advocate was influenced by American Indians in her strong convictions for equal rights for women in the United States.

Historians recognize Stanton and Lucretia Mott as the two women who organized the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, which was the foundation for the women's rights movement in the U.S. Less is known about the influence Iroquois Indian women had upon Stanton, but it is enlightening.

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Our Featured Artist: Honoring Students
Acclaimed Artist Alex Janvier On How Art Brought Escape At Residential School

Residential school is where Alex Janvier was stripped of his culture and language. It's also where he discovered art and a career path that eventually led him to a major exhibition of his life's work at the National Gallery of Canada.

The acclaimed artist of Dene and Saulteaux descent was taken from his family at the La Goff Reserve in Alberta when he was eight years old and sent to the Blue Quills Indian Residential School.

 
Killip Elementary School's Chess Challenge

About thirty-five students from Killip Elementary Chess Team in Flagstaff have qualified to go to Super Nationals in Nashville, Tennessee May 11-15. The only thing holding some of the students back from being able to go is money.

Five thousand participants are expected at the tournament in Nashville, which occurs once every four years. The last time Killip could afford to send a team to the competition, the students placed third in the nation.

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Our Featured Story: First Person History:
Oakland Symphony Presents "Notes From Native America" At The Paramount Theater

The massive, world-wide protest's over the Dakota Access pipeline and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's legal response to gather the support of over 350 American Indian tribes in Indian Country and over 2,000 U.S. military veterans was the reason the Oakland Symphony chose to present "Notes from Native America."

 

History of the
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians
of Michigan

Chapter Eleven
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Education News Education News
CHS Student Selected To Attend Science, Technology Event

Livia Lambert has aspirations of joining the science field and study human and animal behavior. The EBCI tribal member and senior at Cherokee High School will represent her Tribe and school as a North Carolina delegate to the Congress of Future Science and Technology Leaders event being held in Lowell, Mass. near Boston on June 29 – July 1.

 
Chickasaw Musician Traces Success To Arts Academy

Inside Katie Barrick's heart, a war rages between a refined classical violinist and an undisciplined, improvisational fiddler.

As a violinist, Ms. Barrick's instrument gives voice to a disciplined composer's work – each note painstakingly printed on sheet music and performed exactly as the composer intended.

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Education News Education News
ASU American Indian Policy Institute Ignites Tribal Entrepreneurship With Inno-Nations

ASU recently hosted two kick-off events formally launching Inno-Nations, a bold new program it hopes will encourage tribal entrepreneurship and spur economic development throughout Indian Country and in places with a high urban Native American population, like Phoenix.

 
As A Black Native American, Arizona Woman Had To Prove She Was 'Native Enough'

Roicia Banks went to graduate school in Texas, and when she was there, people said to her, "Natives still are alive?"

Natives, as in Native Americans.

Laughing, she continued, "Are you kidding me? Yes, we're alive."

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Honoring Students Education News
Native American Student Cierra Fields Says She Was Removed From Class After Refusing Pledge Of Allegiance

Cierra Fields, a Fort Gibson high school student and member of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma, says she was removed from her classroom on Tuesday morning, February 28 after refusing to stand for or say the pledge of allegiance. Fields, a Champion for Change, anti-rape advocate and correspondent for ICMN, says soon after she said she would not participate, she received a verbal lashing from her teacher.

 
ANSEP Hosts Students From Kenai Peninsula Borough And Lower Kuskokwim

The Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program is currently hosting 47 middle school students from more than 20 schools in the Kenai Peninsula Borough and Lower Kuskokwim school districts for its February Middle School Academy at the University of Alaska Anchorage. During the two-week component, students live like college students while participating in hands-on science, technology, engineering and math activities designed to foster enthusiasm for pursing an education and career in these areas.

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Education News Preserving Language
Noted Producer And Director Chris Eyre Joins The IAIA

Cinematic Arts and Technology Department Chair James Lujan (Taos Pueblo) has announced that Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho) has been engaged as the Outreach Consultant for the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). As part of his duties Eyre will work with Lujan to focus on strengthening the support of the IAIA Cinematic Arts Department in the film community, developing internships, recruiting students, and seeking other resources that will enhance the program’s success.
 
"Changing Views"
a Language Enhance Project

"I am proud to announce a reservation wide campaign to encourage the use and teaching of the Hopi language," said Jeremey King, Facilitator of the Moenkopi Developers Corporations "Changing Views" Language Enhancement Project. "The Project comprises of Community enthusiasts concerned about the current issues surrounding the loss of the Hopi language and Cultural teachings."
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Living Traditions Living Traditions
Team Examines The Evolution Of Wooden Halibut Hooks Carved By Native People Of The Northwest Coast

The Tlingit and Haida, indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast (NWC), have used carved wooden hooks to catch halibut for centuries. As modern fishing technology crept into use, however, the old hooks practically disappeared from the sea. But they thrived on land—as decorative art.
 
Distinguished Photographer Challenges Indigenous Stereotypes

Matika Wilbur, award-winning photographer of Native American descent, presented her lecture, "Changing the Way We See Native America: Dismantling Native American Stereotypes" in Elkins Auditorium on March 21. The event marked the fourth lecture of the W. David Baird Distinguished Lecture Series of the 2016-2017 school year, with the goal to promote diverse discussions on campus.
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Preserving Language Living Traditions
How To revive Massachusetts' First Language

In a classroom on the main floor of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribal resources center, a dozen or so toddlers are speaking a language that until a few decades ago had no living speakers.

 
Monarch Project Celebrated At Cultural Center

Monarch butterfly experts plan a full day of educational and informational delights March 14 at the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur.

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Living History   Living History
Why Russia Gave Up Alaska, America’s Gateway To The Arctic

One hundred and fifty years ago, on March 30, 1867, U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward and Russian envoy Baron Edouard de Stoeckl signed the Treaty of Cession. With a stroke of a pen, Tsar Alexander II had ceded Alaska, his country’s last remaining foothold in North America, to the United States for US$7.2 million.

That sum, amounting to just $113 million in today’s dollars, brought to an end Russia’s 125-year odyssey in Alaska and its expansion across the treacherous Bering Sea, which at one point extended the Russian Empire as far south as Fort Ross, California, 90 miles from San Francisco Bay.

 
The First Humans Arrived In North America A Lot Earlier Than Believed

The timing of the first entry of humans into North America across the Bering Strait has now been set back 10,000 years.

This has been demonstrated beyond a shadow of a doubt by Ariane Burke, a professor in Université de Montréal's Department of Anthropology, and her doctoral student Lauriane Bourgeon, with the contribution of Dr. Thomas Higham, Deputy Director of Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit.

Their findings were published in early January in the open-access journal PLoS One.

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Living Traditions   Living History
Onondaga Nation Teen Named 2017 New York State Fair Indian Village Princess

Kyla Smoke, 18, will represent the Onondaga Nation for 13 days at the fair. She'll be the lead dancer and an announcer. Her duties will also include greeting visitors and answering questions about Haudenosaunee culture and history.
 
Exploring A New Petrified Forest

Petrified National Forest has undergone research in three separate locations, in addition to acquiring 7,000 additional acres. During this archaeological research and expansion, Petrified Forest National Park has undergone a transition that makes it easier for visitors to explore and recognize its ancient inhabitants and the treasure of trees.
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In Every Issue Banner
About This Issue's Greeting - "Um waynuma?"
It's more traditional in Hopi to greet someone by saying "Um waynuma?" (you're around?) or if they are arriving at the place where you are you would say "Um pitu?" (you've come?). Or you might combine these with "haw", and say "Haw, um pitu?" The answer would be "Owí" (yes).
Nature's Beauty:
Wadasé Zhabwé
 
This Issue's
Favorite Web sites
 
A Story To Share:
How The Female Eagle Chooses Her Mate
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Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.
 
 
Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000 - 2017 of Vicki Williams Barry and Paul Barry.
 

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