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Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

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May 2017 - Volume 15 Number 5
 
 
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"Hacho?"
The Kiowa Greeting
How's it going?
 
 

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Atlantic Salmon (salmo salar) Maturing

 
 
Te'minkeses
Month Of The Strawberry
POTAWATOMI
 
 
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""We recognize our relationship to the past and to our future because they are the same thing."
~Winona LaDuke - Anishinabe~
 
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We Salute
Beloved Man To Receive Honorary WCU Degree

He is a U.S. Navy veteran from World War II, a Cherokee historian and storyteller, an Indian ballgame caller, a Cherokee first language speaker, and soon he will be a doctor. EBCI Beloved Man Jerry Wolfe is set to receive an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Western Carolina University during their spring commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 6 at 10am in the WCU Ramsey Regional Activity Center.

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Our Featured Artist: Honoring Students
Nanibah Chacon (Diné-Xicana)

Nani Chacon, originally from Chinle now in Albuquerque, first started painting at age 16 as a graffiti artist. "My interest in art came from a very urban experience." She said representational figurative painting as "classical" and is "technically challenged by the figure;" however she wants her figurative subjects to tell as deeper story.

 
Come As You Are

Although he was told it was “just a phase,” Josh Crumley said he never felt comfortable wearing girl’s clothes. As he grew older, Crumley said being called a girl started to feel like an insult. “I never felt like I was meant to dress like a girl,” he said. “It just never felt comfortable to me. I felt like who I was on the outside wasn’t who I was on the inside.”

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Our Featured Story: First Person History:
A Youth-driven Movement Remakes Attawapiskat

Keisha PaulMartin's first name means "joy," but her early teens were anything but happy in Attawapiskat, the remote Ontario First Nation that drew national attention with its mass youth suicide attempt in April 2016.

When she was 13, in 2010, Keisha tried to take her own life. Her older sister found her in the bathroom after she had slit her wrists.

 

History of the
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians
of Michigan

GRAMMAR OF
THE OTTAWA AND CHIPPEWA LANGUAGE - Nouns
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News and Views Banner
Honoring Students Education News
Millbrook Teen Takes Stellar Hockey Season To The Next Level

Millbrook First Nation teen is carrying his stellar play during the major midget hockey season on to a more elite level after being called up by the Truro Bearcats during their playoff run.

G Blackmore led the Nova Scotia Eastlink Major Midget Hockey League in scoring this season with the Pictou County Weeks, notching 75 points in just 37 games.

 
Barriers to Education Removed For Alaska Teachers

When Isabelle Dyment first stood in front of a classroom, she had no college degree, no teaching certificate and no experience. That was five years ago, and Dyment was hired to teach kindergarten at Ayaprun Elitnaurvik, a Yup'ik immersion school in Bethel, Alaska. A mother of seven and a fluent Yup'ik speaker, Dyment was terrified that first day she became an Alaska teacher.

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Education News Education News
Akwesasne Cultural Restoration Program Awards $300,000

The Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe's Akwesasne Cultural Restoration (ACR) Program announced the latest recipients of settlement funds to support cultural projects in the Akwesasne Community. The Akwesasne Freedom School's Language Nest, Akwesasne Cultural Center, and Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment will each receive $100,000 in Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) Settlement monies to support their work through the end of 2018.

 
Why Native Americans Do Not Separate Religion From Science

Last year five Native American tribes in Washington state managed to repatriate the remains of the “Ancient One,” as they called him, or “Kennewick Man,” as scientists called him.

For the tribes, the Ancient One is to be revered as a human ancestor. But for the scientists, the rare specimen of a 9,000-year-old Kennewick Man was important to understanding the history of North America.

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Honoring Students Education News
Senior Lauren Lefthand To Play Ball In The Land Of Down Under

The lifetime passion and dedication of basketball opened up a once-in-a-lifetime over-seas opportunity for Polson High School Senior Lauren Lefthand. However, the chance to go to Australia this summer did not come from winning championships or winning games for that matter; it was from the skills she gained as a person on the court.

 
OU, Citizen Potawatomi Nation Partner To Offer Course On Native Americans In Film

Joshua Nelson remembers visiting his uncle's home as a kid and seeing American Indians on TV. Sometimes they were the real deal — actual Native American actors. Other times they were white faces hiding behind red paint. Either way, they would catch a bullet courtesy of John Wayne more often than not.

   
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Preserving Language Education News
Native American Hand Talkers Fight To Keep Sign Language Alive

In early September 1930, the Blackfeet Nation of Montana hosted a historic Indian Sign Language Grand Council, gathering leaders of a dozen North American Nations and language groups.

The three-day council held was organized by Hugh L. Scott, a 77-year-old U.S. Army General who had spent a good portion of his career in the American West, where he observed and learned what users called Hand Talk, and what is today more broadly known as Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL).

 
High-speed Internet Coming To Osage Reservation

The Osage Nation recently received an internet access grant of nearly $3 million dollars to provide broadband services to the Grayhorse area, a traditional Osage Nation community on the Osage Reservation in Oklahoma. Selection for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Community Connect Grant is the culmination of the hard work, dedication and vision of many Osage Nation employees and Grayhorse Community supporters. Funds from this grant will be utilized to establish an Osage Nation owned broadband company that will deliver high-speed internet services to Grayhorse and the surrounding area.

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Living Traditions Living Traditions
At Crow Hand-Game Tourney, The Spectacle Is The Thing

I was told by several people that the Crow hand game was difficult to explain, but that once I'd watched a few rounds it would start to make sense.

I suppose it did, sort of in the way that the one cricket game I ever watched had begun to make some sense by the time it ended.

 
To Be Called "IRONWORKERS" Diné Workers Helping To Build Atlanta Falcons' New Stadium

High in the sky and walking on six-inch steel beams is where ironworker Ambrose Steah, 33, keeps things in perspective: A better life for his kids. The single father of two has been "dancing with death," as he put it, since he was 18 years old.

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Preserving Language Preserving Language
Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair

On April 3rd and 4th, hundreds of student speakers and learners of Native languages from all over the state and other locations including one as far as Michigan, gathered at Sam Noble Museum in Norman for the (ONAYLF).

 
Cherokee Language Showcased At Language Fair

Students representing languages from different Oklahoma-based tribes also competed, but the CICS and Grand View students placed in numerous categories, taking home first-, second- and third-place trophies.

   
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What We Do   What We Do
Barton Delves Into Native American Cuisine

Taelor Barton grew up watching her grandmother, Edith Knight, cook. Those cooking sessions inspired Barton to become a chef and share her talent in creating food.

"My grandma did indeed have a huge part in me choosing to be a chef later on in life. It was something that we always did together," the 26-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen said.

 
Dakota Artist Creates Indigemojis

The Tiwahe Foundation in the Twin Cities has given Bernie a grant to expand his Native American and First Nations-themed emoji designs to Android applications for use by Google's mobile devices.

Bernie launched the first release of his Indigemojis designs in October 2016 through Apple Inc.'s iOS platform that is exclusive to Apple's iPhone, iPad and iTouch mobile devices.

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What We Do   What We Do

Here Are the Nominees For The 2017 Indigenous Music Awards

Next month, the Indigenous Music Awards will celebrate and honour achievements from Indigenous artists and industry professionals around the globe. Formerly known as the Aboriginal Peoples' Choice Music Awards, the event is set to hit Winnipeg's Club Regent Event Centre next month. Today, the nominees have been revealed.

Awards will be handed out in 18 categories. There were over 200 submissions from across North America, and the winners were determined by a panel of industry professionals.
 
Join The Burke Museum For A Celebration Of Native Art

Join the Burke Museum for a celebration of Native art. Purchase original art directly from Native artists at the Burke’s annual Native Art Market. Enjoy a memorable day seeing and buying unique pieces with 100% of sales proceeds going directly to the artists!

Also watch art demonstrations and talk to 17 emerging and established Native American/First Nations artists about their work and process. The artists are experts in mediums such as woodcarving, basketry, jewelry, graphic design, sculpture, apparel, metalwork and forging.
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Living Traditions   Living Traditions

Osage Opera Singer Performs Title Role In U.S. Premiere Of
'The Perfect American'

The U.S. debut of Phillip Glass' award-winning opera "The Perfect American" featured Osage operatic baritone Justin Ryan in the title role of Walt Disney. Ryan, who is known for his strong and dramatic tone, reached a new level in his career with the performance.
 
Sturgeon Return To Menominee Indian Reservation During Ceremony

Dozens of giant fish are back in their historic spawning grounds.

It's part of a celebration of sturgeon on the Menominee Indian Reservation.
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Living History   What We Do

Study Reveals 10,000 Years Of Genetic Continuity In Northwest

A study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago.
 

Choctaw Artist Waylon Gary White Deer Is Making Waves In Donegal

Waylon Gary White Deer will always be welcome in Ireland," wrote the late Martin McGuinness in his introduction to the 2012 book Touched By Thunder, a memoir by the artist from the Choctaw nation tribe, who now calls Ireland home.
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What We Do   Living History
For Gulf Coast Thrill Seekers, Alabama Theme Park To Open In May

A new theme park coming to Alabama's Gulf Coast hopes to fill a void left by Hurricane Katrina's destruction of Six Flags New Orleans more than a decade ago.

The Owa theme park, about 45 minutes southeast of Mobile, is set to open May 17. It will feature 20 rides as part of a $500-million complex built by a local Native American tribe.
 

In The 1920s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native Americans For Their Oil Money

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was compelled to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They made their new home in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.
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Living History   Living History

Fairfax Community Foundation Making Efforts To Restore
The Tall Chief Theatre

For nearly 60 years, no one has stepped foot in the Tall Chief Theatre. The theatre is a reminder of days gone past when things were just a little bit easier and Fairfax was a booming oil town full of rich Osage culture and bustling streets.
 

Archaeologist Explains Innovation Of "Fluting" Ancient Stone Weaponry

Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years.
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Living Hiatory   Living History
14,000-year-old village unearthed on B.C. island by UVic student

Alisha Gauvreau, an anthropology PhD student at UVic, has been excavating a rocky spit on Triquet Island, some 500 kilometres northwest of Victoria.

Scientists say the artifacts exhumed on the remote island are painting a picture of how our civilization began.
 
An Alaska Volcano And DNA Reveal The Timing Of Bison's Arrival In North America

After humans, the mammals most successful at colonizing North America were the bison that thundered across the Great Plains.

Just when they arrived on the continent from Asia, however, has long been a mystery.

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Preserving Language   Living History

Karuk Storytellers Bypass Bookshelf

For generations children were taken from Native families in the U.S. and sent to Indian boarding schools where they were instructed in the English language white culture at the expense of their own language and culture. The Karuk Tribe is using a handful of federal grants to move in the other direction with the present generation of young people.
 

Its Location A Mystery For Centuries, Huge Indian City May Have Been Found In Kansas

The discovery could put south-central Kansas on the map as the second-biggest settlement of Native Americans found in the United States, Blakeslee said.
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In Every Issue Banner
About This Issue's Greeting - "Hacho?"
"Hacho?" (pronounced hah-choh) is a friendly greeting. There isn't a word for hello in Kiowa. "Hacho?" means something like "how's it going?'
Nature's Beauty:
Atlantic Salmon
 
This Issue's
Favorite Web sites
 
A Story To Share:
The Little People And The Greedy Hunters
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Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.
 
 
Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000 - 2017 of Vicki Williams Barry and Paul Barry.
 

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