Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America
 
 
NATIVE AMERICA
NATIONS & LANGUAGES
Nakota
see Dakota - Nakota - Lakota
Navajo/Dineh
Diné Inc.
Developing Innovations in Navajo Education , Inc. (Diné Inc.) is a not for profit (501 (c) (3) corporation under the Internal Revenue Code, created and operated under the Articles of Incorporation of the State of Arizona and the Navajo Nation. Originally formalized in 1997 under the name of Seba Dalkai Boarding School, Inc. to transact business related to the pending B.I.A. award of the new school construction funds. Since its inception, the corporation has broadened its scope to encompass educational and community development endeavors for the Navajo communities.
http://www.dineinc.org/
Dine Language
Often, in my travels I'm asked by teachers and others to offer resources for language. At first, this seemed like a huge undertaking. With technology reaching new horizons every day, this challenge seemed attainable. So here, for the first time anywhere, you can hear and learn individual words in a Native tongue.
http://www.spottedeagle.com/dine.htm
Dine' Webpages
Welcome to Cyber Dine'tah. (Navajoland)
http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Dunes/2319/dinetah.html
Discover Navajo Experience
Discover Navajo: People of the Fourth World, describes the stories of the Navajo people from the Creation Story to the present. It marks the first time the Navajo Nation has chosen to tell its story to the world in its own words.
http://www.nativeamericanx.com/discovernavajo/index2.html
LAPAHIE.com - a portal to the Navajo intranet
Web site owner Harrison Lapahie writes, "I am trying to make my site totally Navajo with links to external Navajo sites that are important. It will have in the future, a Navajo/English Dictionary, Navajo/English Word Translator, and others."
http://www.lapahie.com/
Navajo Central Web Site & FAQ's About Life Among the Navajo People
Initially a resource for incoming Foreign Exchange students, this document has evolved to contain nearly 200 questions with answers about day to day living in Navajo Land. The answers have been compiled with the help of many individuals in the community. Each person contributed their unique style and insights. The document continues to grow as new questions are received, though at a slower rate. The questions and answers are valuable information for those moving here as part of their career, for tourists who seek an understanding of the Dineh and for anyone wanting to know more about life among the Dineh (Navajo People.)
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/larry_dilucchio/homepage.htm#faqs
Navajo Code Talkers' Dictionary
An amazing list of Navajo words used during WWII
http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq61-4.htm
Navajo Language - Navajo Language Resource Centre
The Navajo Language Home Page This link provides, amongst other things, contact details and information on courses for non-native speakers of Navajo as well as potential job opportunities and a language proficiency test.
http://www.angelfire.com/nv/navaholang/language.html
Navajo Nation
In 1936, the U.S. Government representatives under Commissioner of Indian Affairs selected Window Rock as the site for the planned Navajo Central Agency. Today, it serves as the capital of the Navajo Nation.
http://www.navajo.org/
Shiprock Pinnacle
The town of Shiprock, population 15,000, is the largest on the Navajo Nation and has been described as a trip to a foreign country. Founded in 1903 by Indian agent William T. Shelton, the original Bureau of Indian Affairs and the old office is still there.
http://www.ausbcomp.com/Redman/shiprock.htm
Sovereign Dineh Nation Chronology
Supplied to this web page by the Sovereign Dineh Nation through consultant, Marsha Monestersky-Chronology of events

http://www.applicom.com/vbm/chron.htm
Narragansett
Narragansett History
Narragansett is an English corruption of Nanhigganeuck, their actual name meaning "people of the small point." The Dutch used the shortened form of Nahican
http://www.dickshovel.com/Narra.html
Narragansett Tribe
The Narragansett Indians are the descendants of the aboriginal people of the State of Rhode Island.
http://www.narragansett-tribe.org/
Nez Perce
Idaho Natives
A Special Report - A team of University of Idaho journalism students traveled the state over the last year to examine life on Idaho’s five Indian reservations. Under the leadership of tribal journalist Lori Edmo-Suppah, the students pursued stories related to key tribal issues, including natural resources, economics, sovereignty and cultural preservation.
http://www.shobannews.com/idaho_natives/intro.html
Nez Perce Literature
"m_lac "_te tit_qan nim_pu hiw_ke waq_pa"(A long time ago, the Nimipu people were not many in number)
http://www.indians.org/welker/nezperce.htm
Nez Perce-Notes by E.S. Curtis
http://www.curtis-collection.com/tribe%20data/nezperce.html
1800s Nez Perce Photography
The photos below are presented for public viewing and education on the Internet. They have been made available by the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
http://www.nezperce.com/~stan/npphoto1.html
Nez Perce Words
http://logos.uoregon.edu/explore/oregon/npwords.html
 
Nez Perce (Nee-Me-Poo) National Historic Trail
The Nez Perce (Nee-Me-Poo) National Historic Trail (NPNHT) was designated by Congress under the National Trails System Act in 1986 to commemorate the 1877 flight of the non-treaty Nez Perce from their homelands in eastern Oregon, Idaho, and Washington across what are today the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.
http://www.fs.fed.us/npnht/
The Nez Perce National Historic Trail Foundation
The Nez Perce National Historic Trail Foundation exists to promote the development of this trail on the ground and to further the interpretation of events of this most significant trail. The Foundation was formed in 1991 and assists the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and many state and local organizations in implementing the comprehensive plan on the ground. An Important Objective of the Foundation is to help educate its members and the public in the significance of this trail in relation to the conflicts between the encroachment of the white settlers and the Nez Perce in their traditional homelands in Idaho and eastern Oregon.
http://nezpercetrail.net/
North Carolina Tribes
North Carolina Tribes
http://www.epsilonchinu.org/north_carolina_tribes.htm
Northwest Coast-Misc.Links pages
Chinook Jargon
http://chinookjargon.home.attbi.com
The Lushootseed Peoples of Puget Sound Country
The Native Americans of Puget Sound have been known as Puget Salish and Southern Coast Salish, and by various spellings of tribes and reservations such as Duwamish, Nisqually, Skagit, and Snoqualmie. In this essay, they are called the Lushootseed peoples.
http://content.lib.washington.edu/aipnw/thrush/
Northwest Indians
The Northwest Indian has known the land for many centuries. Long before the Europeans came to the Pacific Northwest Indians were living and thriving in this thick, luscious rain forest. Their territory spanned from Washington state all the way up to Alaska. They spoke fifteen different languages, grouped into five basic styles. Every region had its own traditions and distinct identity.
http://www.class.uidaho.edu/arch499/nonwest/northwest/
Tribal Journeys
Tribal Journeys is an event among many in a cultural resurgence among Northwest Coast Native Americans and First Nations. It is a reaffirmation of lifeways practiced for millenia, a reawakening of Canoe Culture. For its participants, their villages and hosts, it is a celebration of dependence on the ocean. It is a common expression within villages of ancient knowledge and tradition, it is the solitary expression of strength and courage for paddlers and it is a triumph of survival for Native people.
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/projects/02tribal/welcome.html
Tribes of Washington
Washington contains more than 20 Native American reservations, including one of the largest in the country, belonging to the Yakima peoples. Native American groups comprise 1.7 percent of the population of Washington State.
http://ttt.pugetsoundcenter.org/projects/1998/web/tribal/tribesofwa.htm
Washington Governor's Office of Indian Affairs
http://www.goia.wa.gov/tribalinfo/index.html
Washington Indian Tribes
http://www.kstrom.net/isk/maps/wa/wamap.html
Nuu chah nulth
Nuu Chah nulth Nation
The Nuu-chah-nulth were previously known as the Nootka. Their area, nearly the whole west coast of Vancouver Island, has the most rainfall on Vancouver Island.
http://www.maltwood.uvic.ca/nwcp/nuuchahn/intro.html
Nuu Chah nulth Tribal Council
Members of the tribal council. All material published in this web is for convenience of reference and information purposes only.
http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ops/fm/afs/agreements/agree_pages/Nuu_chah_nulth.htm
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  Canku Ota is a free, bi-weekly, online Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 Fair Use doctrine of international copyright law. Please read our privacy policy.  
 
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